II. ‘A la Carte’ DRS Prevention Services


 

Companies can choose individual or multiple components of the “Complete DRS Program”. However, we strongly encourage the complete program if you are looking for long-term, sustainable and continuous improvements in preventing musculoskeletal injuries.

 

Ergonomic/MSD Risk Assessment Functional Demand Evaluation (FDE) Job Matching Evaluation (JME) Movement Maintenance Program
(MMP)
Focused (Interactive) Workshops Programs to Build In-house Expertise MSD Consultation
  • 2.1 Ergonomic/MSD Risk Assessment: this is an objective assessment of the risk for musculoskeletal injury related to work tasks. The resulting data and information identifies priorities for ergonomic redesign, and forms the basis of designing task-specific prevention programs for workers who perform the work tasks. A wide range of validated assessment tools are utilized specific to the work tasks to be assessed; i.e. office work, manual material handling, repetitive manual manipulation, construction work, healthcare services, full range of manufacturing environments etc. When ergonomic improvements are made the risk assessment tool can be repeated and post scores compared to the base line scores to show an objective percentage of improvement. The DRS could perform the risk assessments, or could provide in-house training to a designated group to perform them.
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  • 2.2 Functional Demand Evaluation (FDE): this is an objective assessment and measurement of the physical demands of a job title; sometimes referred to as a “functional job description”. The FDE can be utilized to identify MSD risk, as the basis for developing a ‘job matching evaluation’ (JME) or post-offer physical abilities test, and to improve the specificity of task-specific prevention programs and activities. There are three phases to the FDE process:
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    • Preliminary phase – identify FDE target(s) and the essential functions of the job title(s). This includes a tour of the facility and meetings/interviews with key managers, supervisors, employees and employee representatives when applicable.
      • Preliminary phase – identify FDE target(s) and the essential functions of the job title(s). This includes a tour of the facility and meetings/interviews with key managers, supervisors, employees and employee representatives when applicable.
      • Measurement phase – measure the essential physical demands of each of the jobs and the work tasks involved.
      • Validation phase – analyze data, write up a draft of the FDE report, and then submit to management and key employees for validation and/or modification. Once all agree to the accuracy of the report, a final version is submitted for the record.
    • * An FDE ranges from a simple to a complex process depending on how many work components there are included in the job title, the complexity of the work tasks and the number of interested parties (i.e. stake-holders) in the review process.

      ** An FDE should be reviewed on a routine basis (e.g. annually, semi-annually) to determine if essential functions and/or physical demands have changed. It should be promptly reviewed when known changes occur, particularly if it forms the basis for having developed a JME.

       

    • 2.3 Job Matching Evaluation (JME): this is an objective evaluation of an individual’s ability to meet the physical demands of the essential functions of a job safely and acceptably. This is sometimes referred to as a post-offer physical abilities test. The intent is to prevent musculoskeletal injuries related to a mismatch between physical demand and physical ability (i.e. when a worker does not have the strength, endurance range of motion etc. to perform the work tasks the risk for injury is great). The JME applies only for the specific job title identified in a validated and current FDE. There are three phases to creating the JME:
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      • Development phase – based on the FDE, a battery of tests are constructed to measure the ability of an individual to safely and acceptably meet the demands of the essential functions of the job.
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      • Validation phase – the test battery is given to a sufficient number of workers/managers experienced in performing the work tasks of the job to determine reliability, validity and applicability. Modifications to the test battery are made as needed to achieve acceptability.
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      • Completion phase – once accepted, final documents are completed and submitted; i.e. procedural manual, recording and reporting forms. The JME is now ready to be used for post-offer testing; the test takes 1-hour to complete (± 5 – 10 minutes).
    • ** The JME is reviewed whenever the relevant FDE is re-evaluated as indicated above.

       

    • 2.4 Movement Maintenance Program (MMP): this is a daily group ‘posture body mechanic improvement and stretching program’ designed to prevent those MSD associated with identified risk factors and the history of injuries with the work tasks in the targeted work areas. The stretching session takes 5 – 10 minutes, and is performed 1 – 2 times per day. Originally we called this the Movement maintenance Program, but retitled the program in 2012. There are three phases to implementing the EEP:
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      • Employee Leader Training – key supervisors and workers that will lead the group session are trained to implement the program safely and effectively. This requires 3 or more 1 hour training sessions.
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      • Kickoff Workshop – a 60-minute workshop is provided to orient the workers in the targeted areas to the program; the emphasis is to provide clear guidelines for safe and effective stretching, practice proper technique for core (starting) stretches and motivate for participation and connection to other prevention behaviors and activities.
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      • Implement and Assess – provide support and supervision initially, assist with problem-solving individual issues and modify or progress the program as needed for continuous improvement.
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      * DRS can also develop similar program for strength and conditioning (i.e. called “strategic strength and conditioning”) that help workers restore and maintain the ability to meet the physical demands of their work with a margin of safely throughout their working years. These are usually best added after employees have improved their posture, body mechanics and range of motion via the Core Movement maintenance Program.

       

    • 2.5 Focused (target-specific) workshops – these range from 10 to 60 minute interactive workshops to enhance the workers and managers knowledge and skills in preventing specific MSD and improving the performance of work tasks to reduce risk for injury. The topics are prioritized by risk, warning-signal and injury analysis. These workshops are accompanied by support materials and can be scheduled on an ‘as needed’ basis or as a routine of safety/injury prevention talks. DRS experts can lead these workshops and/or scripted presentations can be developed for supervisors (i.e. Toolbox Talks) and other designated groups. This can also include ongoing programs to mitigate risks that require slow, cumulative building of knowledge, physical skills and abilities. An example is our BackAbilityTM program that addresses employees who are not participating in exercise programs and/or avoiding normal activities because of a fear of re-injury (kinesiophobia) – this program has been effective at guiding this group of people back to exercise and activity since its development in the mid-1980s. This and other programs can be purchased and downloaded through a request using the contact page on this website.

       

    • 2.6 In-house Expertise – this includes training in-house personnel to perform ergonomic and MSD risk assessment, identify worker-intrinsic risk factors and facilitate correction, and to develop MSD prevention champions within your organization. This includes formal educational programs for all stake-holders in your organization.
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    • 2.7 MSD Consultation – preventing work-related MSDs is a complex, multi-faceted and multi-disciplinary endeavor. Duffy-Rath has extensive expertise that can help the health, safety and medical team enhance their skills and knowledge to develop a prevention-oriented culture. Wayne or Jean can be hired to come to your organization and help solve a specific MSD-related problem or provide a complete review of the construction of all the programs ranging from prevention efforts to treatment and disability management.
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Cost: The cost for these services is billed at an hourly or project rate plus expenses.